Lusternia vs Food: Cheeeeeeeeese Edition

24

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  • XenthosXenthos Shadow Lord Member Posts: 6,977 Transcendent
    edited November 2015
    There are (very rare) tex-mex restaurants outside of Texas.  Some of them are even similar to tex-mex restaurants in Texas (though, admittedly, not all because some are just trying to use the name-- and even the closer ones still have a few variations to account for regional tastes and differences).  It's definitely not Texas-only though!

    I completely agree with your comment on American cuisine though.  We tend to take things from other cultures, make changes to them / combine them in different ways, and then call them ours.
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  • XeriaXeria Member Posts: 633 Gifted
    *Coughcouhfriedricecoughcough* @Tarkenton (unless, of course, you're of asian or polynesian heritage)
    is dead like the dodo
  • XenthosXenthos Shadow Lord Member Posts: 6,977 Transcendent
    edited November 2015
    You guys looking for a fight over barbeque might want to go have a debate with Wikipedia instead:

    Some etymologists believe that barbecue derives from the word barabicu found in the language of the Taíno people of the Caribbean and the Timucua of Florida,[1] and it has entered multiple European languages in the form of barbacoa. Specifically, the Oxford English Dictionary traces the word back to Haiti, that translates as a "framework of sticks set upon posts".[2] Gonzalo Fernández De Oviedo y Valdés, a Spanish explorer, was the first to use the word "barbecoa" in print in Spain in 1526 in the Diccionario de la Lengua Española (2nd Edition) of the Real Academia Española.[3] After Columbus landed in the Americas in 1492, the Spaniards had seemed to have found native Haitians roasting animal meat over a grill consisting of a wooden framework resting on sticks and a fire made underneath. The flames and smoke would rise and envelop the animal meat, giving it a certain flavor.[4] Strangely enough, the same framework was used as a means of protection against animal attacks at night.
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  • EnyalidaEnyalida Nasty Woman, Sockpuppeteer to the Gods Member Posts: 4,386 Transcendent
    Heeey, that makes BBQ firmly in my wheelhouse, being both texan and (if you go far enough back), of Taino descent. Yeah, explaining the five (at least) zones of texas to people here in NC is a thing that happens. Massive country is massive.
  • TarkentonTarkenton Traitor Bear Member Posts: 2,555 Transcendent
    @Xeria I'm a whitey. Best friend's mom and my dad's best friend who owned a Chinese restaurant taught me a fair bit about island and Chinese cuisine.
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  • XeriaXeria Member Posts: 633 Gifted
    edited November 2015
    i'm asian! (yes, we do eat alot of rice. in fact, i have to eat rice or noodles every so often or it doesn't feel right. meat tends to be a side dish rather than a main. we don't eat it in the same quantities as american's are depicted as eating)
    is dead like the dodo
  • ShaddusShaddus , the Leper Messiah Outside your window.Member Posts: 8,210 Transcendent
    Is anyone other than me really wanting to flag all of these annoying food posts because they aren't tweets about Lusternia?
    Everiine said: The reason population is low isn't because there are too many orgs. It's because so many facets of the game are outright broken and protected by those who benefit from it being that way. An overabundance of gimmicks (including game-breaking ones), artifacts that destroy any concept of balance, blatant pay-to-win features, and an obsession with convenience that makes few things actually worthwhile all contribute to the game's sad decline.
  • RancouraRancoura the Last Nightwreathed Queen CanadaMember Posts: 1,504 Transcendent
    Whoops.

    I will make a note related to both sides, then, and say that I enjoy how creative people get with designs that translate real-world ethnic foods into Lusternia-acceptable (though at times questionably) dishes. For example, I once saw a sushi dish described as something like "slices of raw fish over rice." Bravo.

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    And endless starless night
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  • CyndarinCyndarin used Flamethrower! It was super effective. Member Posts: 4,508 Transcendent
    Shaddus said:
    Is anyone other than me really wanting to flag all of these annoying food posts because they aren't tweets about Lusternia?
    I'm certain you're not. Inevitably, no matter the topic, people will spoil their britches because other people had the audacity to make a handful of posts about something some other person deigns unworthy of their attention. 

    Not participating is hard. I know. 
    image
  • SiamSiam Whispered Voice Member Posts: 2,631 Transcendent
    POTATOES SHALL RULE OVER EVERYONE.
    Viravain, Lady of the Thorns shouts, "And You would seize Me? Fool! I am the Glomdoring! I am the Wyrd, and beneath the cloak of Night, the shadows of the Silent stir!"

    #bringShikariback 


  • LuceLuce Fox Populi Member Posts: 2,607 Transcendent
    I also wonder why no one ever considers lobster American food, considering how closely it's tied to Maine's perceived cultural heritage.
  • EveriineEveriine Wise Old Swordsbird / Brontaur Indianapolis, IN, USAMember Posts: 2,968 Transcendent
    Luce said:
    I also wonder why no one ever considers lobster American food, considering how closely it's tied to Maine's perceived cultural heritage.
    Because it's not greasy, smothered in Velveeta, or red meat.
    Everiine is a man, and is very manly. This MAN before you is so manly you might as well just gender bend right now, cause he's the manliest man that you ever did see. His manly shape has spurned many women and girlyer men to boughs of fainting. He stands before you in a manly manerific typical man-like outfit which is covered in his manly motto: "I am a man!"

    Daraius said: You gotta risk it for the biscuit.

    Pony power all the way, yo. The more Brontaurs the better.

  • TalanTalan Member Posts: 1,000 Transcendent

    Everiine said:

    Because it's not greasy, smothered in Velveeta, or red meat.
    It is literally served with a stick of melted butter.
    #NoWireHangersEver

    Vive l'apostrophe!
  • EveriineEveriine Wise Old Swordsbird / Brontaur Indianapolis, IN, USAMember Posts: 2,968 Transcendent
    Talan said:

    Everiine said:

    Because it's not greasy, smothered in Velveeta, or red meat.
    It is literally served with a stick of melted butter.
    And yet is still not greasy enough.
    Everiine is a man, and is very manly. This MAN before you is so manly you might as well just gender bend right now, cause he's the manliest man that you ever did see. His manly shape has spurned many women and girlyer men to boughs of fainting. He stands before you in a manly manerific typical man-like outfit which is covered in his manly motto: "I am a man!"

    Daraius said: You gotta risk it for the biscuit.

    Pony power all the way, yo. The more Brontaurs the better.

  • KaalakKaalak Member Posts: 515 Fabled
    edited November 2015
    Rancoura said:
    Celina said:

    2) "American food," is a bit of a misnomer, IMHO. You have to remember something about the US: it's big. We have states larger than every European country. The UK is a third the size of Texas. It's twice the size of Germany. Food is very regional, largely for the same reasons food in Europe is regional. Distance. In Texas, we have a style of food called Tex-Mex, and it's literally only in Texas. Southernern food is very different than west coast food like California which is very different than the midwest like Kansas



    Not sure about elsewhere, but up here in the major grocery stores we definitely have a shredded cheese mix called Tex Mex by Kraft. Not saying it's actually Tex-Mex food, just noting the same name!

    The mix is cheddar, mozzarella, montery jack and jalapenos. Sound like something used in Tex-Mex dishes?

    Kraft made this? You do not mix the cheese of my people in Tex Mex!!! I declare Crusade! *sounds horn* *girds loins*
  • KaalakKaalak Member Posts: 515 Fabled
    Portius said:
    This might be the NY upbringing talking, but I'm fairly sure that applejack is distilled cider. It's like northerner moonshine.

    I have also heard the area surrounding Paris makes excellent applejack. I have a bottle of some French apple liquor from France but it is not from Paris and I haven't cracked it.
  • TylwythTylwyth Member Posts: 1,736 Mythical
    Xenthos said:
    I do not understand some of you people. Sure, some combinations may be cheap, but not all are (and flavour / tastiness can vary wildly). It is also not even American or "patriotic,"



    Uh, patriotic doesn't mean "invented in" or "only used in" so yes, it is patriotic.
    FOR pposters who aren't steingrim:

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  • SsalissSsaliss Member Posts: 3,575 Transcendent
    Well, by that logic, I could claim that all food is patriotic to all countries.
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  • TylwythTylwyth Member Posts: 1,736 Mythical
    Works for me. xD


    On a more serious note, not really. Only chinese take out and hamburgers and hot dogs and stuff is patriotic. xD
    FOR pposters who aren't steingrim:

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  • VentidiusVentidius Member Posts: 291 Gifted
    Keep hyour fancy complex stuff. The best thing is the full English. Hash browns, sausage, beans, eggs, toast, tomatoes, bacon. Whether depressed, hung over or frustrated, cures everything.

    Arcanis said:
    Enough damn food, more politic posts.
    Tweets version of 'politic posts' keeps getting it closed.
  • SynkarinSynkarin Nothing to see here Member Posts: 3,216 Transcendent
    So this talk about AppleJacks made me crave the cereal a bit

    And when I got home, my wife had bought Wegman's brand Applesnaps!

    What are the odds

    Everiine said:
    "'Cause the fighting don't stop till I walk in."
    -Synkarin's Lament.
  • VentidiusVentidius Member Posts: 291 Gifted

    Synkarin said:
    So this talk about AppleJacks made me crave the cereal a bit

    And when I got home, my wife had bought Wegman's brand Applesnaps!

    What are the odds
    Ten to one says they don't have anything close to apple in them ;))
  • KagatoKagato Auckland, New ZealandMember Posts: 1,304 Mythical
    edited November 2015
    Xenthos said:
    You guys looking for a fight over barbeque might want to go have a debate with Wikipedia instead:

    Some etymologists believe that barbecue derives from the word barabicu found in the language of the Taíno people of the Caribbean and the Timucua of Florida,[1] and it has entered multiple European languages in the form of barbacoa. Specifically, the Oxford English Dictionary traces the word back to Haiti, that translates as a "framework of sticks set upon posts".[2] Gonzalo Fernández De Oviedo y Valdés, a Spanish explorer, was the first to use the word "barbecoa" in print in Spain in 1526 in the Diccionario de la Lengua Española (2nd Edition) of the Real Academia Española.[3] After Columbus landed in the Americas in 1492, the Spaniards had seemed to have found native Haitians roasting animal meat over a grill consisting of a wooden framework resting on sticks and a fire made underneath. The flames and smoke would rise and envelop the animal meat, giving it a certain flavor.[4] Strangely enough, the same framework was used as a means of protection against animal attacks at night.


    * a little off-topic, but personally has a bit of a soft spot for a local type of food called Hangi, a type of food which involves BURYING the food and cooking it in the ground (usually done with heated stones or similar) - it is a very slow method of cooking though, taking several hours. *

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hāngi - obligatory wiki information for those curious
    Never put passion before principle.  Even if you win, you lose.

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  • KaalakKaalak Member Posts: 515 Fabled
    I believe Caesar dressing was invented in Mexico and it is a fantastic adopted American food (chicken Caesar salads that is). I know chop suey was a dish of thrown together stuff invented in SF I think by an annoyed Chinese cook, but didn't an American version of Chow Mein also originate from the US?
  • CyndarinCyndarin used Flamethrower! It was super effective. Member Posts: 4,508 Transcendent
    Deep fried everything is American food. Texas State Fair is basically a yearly competition where people try to deep fry everything in the grocery store. Everything. Everything. 

    Last year, the winner was deep fried carrot cake. Previous winners include deep fried bacon cinnamon roll, deep fried bubblegum (ew), deep fried butter, deep fried bacon, deep fried coke, deep fried beer, etc. 

    It's real, I'm not kidding. 

    image
  • KaalakKaalak Member Posts: 515 Fabled
    I vaguely remember something called 'bags of gold' which were broccoli and cheese of some sort in a (totally unhealthy) pastry that was then deep fried.

    The broccoli part was crunchy and decent.  
  • DrocillaDrocilla Member, Gods Posts: 500 Divine
    Only vaguely related but I love to prepare what I fondly call my Ceasar's Spicy Greek Salad and which consists of: various lettuces, jalapenos and other spicy peppers, red onions, feta, croutons, cubed chicken, parmesan, and a dressing (greek yogurt + mayo + spicy blend of spices).
  • KaalakKaalak Member Posts: 515 Fabled
    edited November 2015
    Celina said:
    Deep fried everything is American food. Texas State Fair is basically a yearly competition where people try to deep fry everything in the grocery store. Everything. Everything. 

    Last year, the winner was deep fried carrot cake. Previous winners include deep fried bacon cinnamon roll, deep fried bubblegum (ew), deep fried butter, deep fried bacon, deep fried coke, deep fried beer, etc. 

    It's real, I'm not kidding. 




    Smoky Bacon Margarita? What the hell is this?

    An unconventional pairing of flavors adds a subtle smoky taste to a traditionally tangy drink. The Smoky Bacon Margarita takes the smokiness of freshly-cooked bacon and infuses it into a frozen lime margarita. With just a hint of smoke, this drink still captures the zesty citrus flavor of a traditional margarita. Finished off with a pinch of bacon crumbles on top, this thirst-quenching drink is served in a collectible souvenir cup for an added funky flair. Sip on this refreshing beverage and cool off from the Texas heat! Contains alcohol – must be 21 years of age.

  • KaalakKaalak Member Posts: 515 Fabled
    edited November 2015
    Chicken Fried Lobster with Champagne Gravy sounds good though. 

    For the first time in Big Tex Choice Awards history, lobster has made its way on the menu. Adding a flair of fair to a traditionally sophisticated dish, this seafood spread includes an entire lobster tail, breaded and deep fried to perfection. Served with a rich sauce combining lemon butter and champagne gravy, the Chicken Fried Lobster is not your typical carnival concoction. With the lavishness of a lobster dinner and the fried factor of a traditional fair food, this dish will satisfy both a fondness for fanciness and a craving for the classics. 

    What is the 'correct' definition of Chicken Fried?


    :D

    Celina tell me you've been to see a live pig race!
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